Low in Fat - High in Protein

Meat may tend to be high in saturated fat, but there are a few exceptions. Wild game meats, such as venison, are low in saturated fats. This is often the motivation behind people choosing venison.

Full of Nutrients

Venison contains all 10 of the essential amino acids which are the compounds that are responsible for chemical reactions in the body, and which also play a role in metabolic function. 

Venison is full of B vitamins: B2 (riboflavin) and B3 (niacin), which help regulate metabolism; and vitamin B6 and B12, which may lower homocysteine build-up in the blood, thus lowering the risk of heart attacks and strokes. 

Venison has advantages in iron, niacin, and riboflavin.

WIld V Farmed

An important difference between beef and venison is the way in which these animals are raised. 

Beef are raised on farms, often being fed concentrated feeds to encourage growth and mature before they are 2 years old.

Wild are free to roam, to eat whatever natural vegetation they can forage and lead a natural lifestyle.

Wild meats contain half the fat of farmed and twice the nutrients!

 

 

Nutritional Values

  Pheasant Turkey Chicken Wild Rabbit* Venison Lamb Beef
per 100g               
kcal 119 111 105 114 104 472 191
kJ 505 469 443 477 442 720 800
g/100g              
protein 27.1 25.2 20.1 21.8 23.4 20.8 23.1
fat 1.2 1.1 1.5 2.32 2 9.9 11
sat fat 0.39 0 0.5 0.69 0 4.75 4.39
mg/100g              
cholesterol 66 65 90 81 85 90 99
sodium 40 64 37 n/a 44 43 49
iron 1 0.2 0.2 3.2 2.4 1.6 1.4
zinc 0.8 1.2 0.5 n/a 1.8 2.5 3.5
mg/kg              
selenium 0.37 0.1 0.1 n/a 0.04 0.08 0.04
               

All values are for raw meat

Results from the research commissioned by the Game to Eat campaign – Leatherhead Food International Research 2006

*Results – Dish the info